Hello Readers!

 

In this week’s blog post, we will be looking at a segment on the Eames.com Wiki segment, dedicated to the various War time designs which were Eames prototypes designs to be used for aid purposes during War time. 

 

This series was designed between 1942 and 1945 and were made from molded plywood layers, known as Plyform material.

Why War time?

 

‘War time’ involved a lot of collaborative work, especially when it came to completing projects and tasks. One of the many negative impacts of the war was the lack of resources it left behind. 

 

As a result, not only did new ones have to be made, such as the war time furniture, but also the resources to make them had to be found, which required teamwork. 

 

Through this, the famous Eames leg splint was designed, between 1941 and 1942. This can be found in our Timeline section on the Wiki. 

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Trusty Eames Leg Splint

 

What made this piece so famous? This Leg Splint has become quite a collector’s piece over the years.

 

In addition to the fact that it’s stunning to look at, holds a lot of sentimental value and showcases innovation, but it’s also a redesign of the medical apparatus which, created by Charles Eames which provided a positive contribution to the second World War. 

 

The influence came from previous poorly designed splints which were used by the US Navy and so this was definitely a tremendous creation. It’s estimated that over 150,000 may have been produced.

Practical Prototypes

 

While there are a couple of well-known pieces that are in the Eames war time category, there were also other prototypes that were released, still stunning to look at. 

 

A full body litter was designed in the years between 1942 and 1945 and this was a part of the war time prototype series. This was a stretcher which was created by using layers of molded plywood which was fused together.

 

Other war time prototypes that were released was the arm splint, Kazaam machine and also certain parts for the CG-16 Glider aircraft.

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                                                     Eames.com Wiki

 

This is just one of the many segments on the Eames.com Wiki. We understand that although you may not be buying or selling pieces like this, it’s there if you ever need it. In addition to that, the historic backgrounds are an interesting read, especially if you are a collector. We have all the facts from the year the pieces were created, the theories and specifications.

 

 

We hope you enjoyed this week’s blog post!

 

Until next time, have fun browsing!

 

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